7 Beta Surveys You’re Not Using…But Should Be!

Surveys are probably the first thing people think of when they think of beta testing, and for good reason. They are one of the most commonly used forms of feedback in beta testing, and are used in just about every beta test because they’re a straightforward way to collect quantifiable data that can point to trends amongst beta users. If used thoughtfully, surveys can be one of the most effective tools in a beta manager’s toolbox.

Part of what makes surveys so great is their level of customization. Surveys are an incredibly versatile asset, offering beta managers many different ways to ask questions and collect information from testers throughout a test. You can build a survey around about anything (a goal, a feature, a bug) — it just depends on what you’re trying to accomplish. In an effort to help you capitalize on the power of surveys, we created a list of seven “must use” surveys for your next beta test.

7 Popular Survey Types

  1. First Impressions Survey – This survey is given to testers at the very beginning of a test and covers any unboxing, onboarding, or installation processes testers experienced. This survey also asks about a tester’s initial impressions of the product.
  2. Feature-Specific Surveys – These surveys ask testers detailed questions about their usage of, and opinion about, a specific feature.
  3. Feature Usage Survey – This survey lists the features of a product and asks testers which features they’ve used to assess coverage and popularity of certain features.
  4. Weekly Surveys – These surveys check in with testers on a weekly basis to gauge their experience with the product that week, and ask standard questions that track customer acceptance metrics over the course of the test.
  5. Task Follow-up Surveys – These surveys are given to testers after they’ve completed a task (or tasks) to get more detailed information about the tester’s user experience while completing the task(s).
  6. Product Review Survey – These surveys ask the tester to rate the product overall and for an explanation of that rating.
  7. Final Survey – This survey is the last activity your testers complete during your test. It looks at the big picture to see what testers thought about your product features and the overall user experience.

By diversifying the kinds of surveys you use in your beta test, you are much more likely to collect the feedback needed to improve your product. Aside from collecting product feedback itself, using diverse survey types can also improve a beta manager’s management capabilities during a beta. If you’re looking to bolster your beta feedback arsenal, these seven survey types are for you. If you want to know more about surveys in our newest whitepaper, check out The Feedback Playbook.

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